It's all just casual
It's all just casual
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Q: POOP
Asked by theres-a-frie
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illustratedladies:

Stevie Lewis.
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humansofnewyork:

I was waiting on the subway platform late last night, when a girl walked by with an interesting brooch in her hair. I wasn’t sure if it’d make a good photo or not. I was tired, and didn’t feel like moving, but I mustered up the energy to chase her down for a pic. When I walked around the corner, Mediocre Brooch Girl had disappeared. And THIS WOMAN was standing in her place. I’m almost positive there’s a life-affirming metaphor in there somewhere.
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theniftyfifties:

Eddie Cochran
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this-ride:

Arin’s drumstick*-*
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this-ride:

I’m just gonna post another picture, cus I’m so obsessed with this drumstick.
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marckremers:

(via Britain from Above: Thousands of historic aerial photographs go online for the first time today | Mail Online)
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brookhavenlab:

Just taking a dip in the pool and working on a Nobel Prize-winning experiment.
In 1964, Brookhaven chemist Blair Munhofen used the Lab’s swimming pool to test this prototype eductor (liquid jet pump), later used in the Homestake Mine neutrino detector out in South Dakota. Nearly a mile underground, eductors like this mixed helium into a 100,000-gallon tank of common dry-cleaning fluid.
The experiment was designed to detect solar neutrinos, ghost-like subatomic particles produced by the nuclear fusion that powers the sun. These elusive cosmic neutrinos interacted with the chlorine molecules in that giant tank of cleaning fluid and created detectable argon atoms. The experiment not only confirmed the existence of solar neutrinos, but it detected just one-third of the quantity predicted by theory – this became known as the solar neutrino problem. The revelation led not only to Brookhaven’s Ray Davis winning the 2002 Nobel Prize, but it also uncovered the shape-shifting oscillations of neutrinos, an ongoing puzzle with major fundamental implications. 
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theniftyfifties:

Pier Angeli, 1954.